Brady, Patriots top Broncos 41-16

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) cheers Patriots fans as he leaves the field after an NFL football game against the Denver Broncos, Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017, in Denver. The Patriots won 41-16. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey)

DENVER (AP) — Denver is no longer Tom Brady’s House of Horrors and the Broncos sure don’t scare anybody anymore.

Iran-Iraq border quake death toll at 220 and rising

People stand in the street after feeling aftershocks from an earthquake in Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017. The deadly earthquake hit the region along the border between Iran and Iraq on Sunday. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake was centered 19 miles (31 kilometers) outside the eastern Iraqi city of Halabja. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — A powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake that struck the Iraq-Iran border region killed at least 220 people in both countries, sent people fleeing their homes into the night and was felt as far west as the Mediterranean coast, authorities reported on Monday.

Trump does not publicly rebuke Duterte for drug war killings

President Donald Trump, left, shakes hands with Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte at an ASEAN Summit dinner at the SMX Convention Center, Sunday, Nov. 12, 2017, in Manila, Philippines. Trump is on a five country trip through Asia traveling to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has sanctioned a bloody drug war that features extrajudicial killing. He called Barack Obama a “son of a whore.” This week, he boasted that he murdered a man with his own hands.

Wyoming businesses, lawmakers back proposed tourism tax

In this Feb. 25, 2016, photo, tourists walk by the Old Faithful Visitor Center in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. A legislative panel is considering a new tax to help fund Wyoming's tourism promotion efforts. The Legislature's Joint Revenue Committee on Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017 is drafting a bill that would impose a 1 percent tax at hotels, restaurants, bars and other leisure and hospitality establishments around the state. (Ryan Jones/Jackson Hole News & Guide via AP)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Many in the restaurant and lodging industries expressed their support last week for a tax that could end the Wyoming Office of Tourism’s dependence on the state’s general fund.

Revising sage grouse plans is a contentious issue

Peggy Redick, in orange, speaks to visitors about possible corrections to Sage-Grouse monitoring habitats during a public forum to allow citizens to voice their concerns to representatives of the Bureau of Land Management about Sage-Grouse and habitat conservation on Monday. John Roark/ jroark@postregister.com

For years, the issue of protecting public land occupied by sage grouse across the region has been a contentious battle of balance between land use and habitat conservation.

Students connect to culture at Grand Teton National Park

In this Sept. 30 photo, Grand Teton National Park ranger Sarin LoMascolo gathers sixth-graders from Arapahoe Middle School, around what may have been an ancient teepee ring in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. For many it was the first time they had taken the three-hour ride to Jackson, a field trip arranged in part to connect the Northern Arapaho students to the cultural and historical heritage of the park. Ryan Dorgan / Jackson Hole News & Guide

JACKSON, Wyo. — The kids stand in a circle, zipping up jackets and clutching blankets they’d hauled off the school bus that brought them to Grand Teton National Park from the Wind River Reservation.

Blackfoot couple raising conjoined twins

Nick Torres hugs his daughters, conjoined twins, Carter, left, and Callie at the Utah Center For Assistive Technology in Salt Lake City, on Monday. The Utah Center for Assistive Technology is having a fitting for a specialized jumper made for conjoined twins. The device is the first to help the girls into a standing position with no assistance. Adam Fondren / The Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — When Nick Torres learned his wife was carrying conjoined twins, one of the many earth-shattering realizations that swept over him was that buying basic necessities for his daughters — from clothing, to car seats, to toys — would become exponentially more complex.

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