Judge takes hard line on splitting families

This July 17, 2018 photo provided by the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of California shows Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego. Judge Sabraw, who ordered children be reunited with their families after being separated at the US-Mexico border, has been unyielding in his insistence that the Trump administration meet his deadline. Judge Sabraw gave the government until Thursday, July 26, 2018 to reunite more than 2,500 children 5 years old and older.(Martin Panuco/U.S. District Court in the Southern District of California via AP)

SAN DIEGO (AP) — U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw appeared conflicted in early May on whether to stop families from being separated at the border. He challenged the Trump administration to explain how families were getting a fair hearing guaranteed by the Constitution, but also expressed reluctance to get too deeply involved with immigration enforcement.

Messaging apps increasingly used for public business

FILE - In this May 30, 2018, file photo, Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer, right, answers a question from reporters as Lt. Gov. Tracey Mann, left, listens during a news conference in Topeka, Kan. Kansas Gov. Colyer in February issued an executive order that requires his staff to use official email accounts for all government business. He also banned private accounts for any communications related to "the functions, activities, programs, or operations" of the office. (AP Photo/John Hanna, File)

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — One app promotes itself as a way to discuss sensitive negotiations and human resources problems without leaving a digital record.

Man firing into Toronto cafes shoots 14, killing one

Police escort civilians away from the scene of a shooting, Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Toronto. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP)

TORONTO (AP) — A man firing a handgun into restaurants and cafes as he walked along a Toronto street shot 14 people, killing one of them, before dying after an exchange of gunfire with police late Sunday, police said.

UK police: Boy, 3, was attacked with acid at store

A general view of the Home Bargains store where a man is accused of an acid attack on a young boy, in Worcester, England, Sunday, July 22, 2018. British police say a 3-year-old boy suffered severe burns on his face and arm during a suspected acid attack that investigators think was deliberate. West Mercia police Chief Superintendent Mark Travis said police are working to identify the substance that burned the child on Saturday at a discount store in Worcester, England. (Matthew Cooper/PA via AP)

LONDON (AP) — A 3-year-old boy suffered severe burns on his face and arm during a suspected acid attack in England that investigators think was deliberate, police said Sunday.

Lebanon survives on floating power plants

ADVIn this Monday, July 16, 2018 photo, two men ride a jet ski off the Lebanese coast as a floating power station waits off the coast at Jiyeh, south of Beirut, Lebanon. Lebanon received a floating power station from Turkey this week to ease the rolling blackouts that are a feature of its sticky summers. The 235-megawatt Esra Sultan, built and operated by the private Turkish company Karadeniz Energy, was billed by Energy and Water Minister Cesar Abi Khalil as a temporary but thrifty measure to bridge part of Lebanon's chronic electricity deficit. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

BEIRUT (AP) — Lebanon has for decades struggled with daily power cuts that leave residents sweating through their shirts summer after sticky summer.

Gunmen in South Africa ambush taxi drivers; 11 killed

A minibus with bullet holes on its side is seen on the road between Weenen and Colenso, in KwaZulu Natal province, South Africa, early Sunday, July 22, 2018. South African police say gunmen opened fire Saturday night on the vehicle carrying members of a taxi drivers' association, killing 11 people and critically wounding four others. (Claudine Senegal/Ladysmith Herald via AP)

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — South African police say gunmen have opened fire on a minibus carrying members of a taxi drivers’ association, killing 11 people and critically wounding four others.

G-20 calls for more dialogue on rising trade tensions

Christine Lagarde, right, International Monetary Fund Managing Director and Argentina Treasury Minister Nicolas Dujovne arrives for a press conference during the G20 meeting of Finance Ministers and Central Bank governors in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, July 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Gustavo Garello)

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — The world’s top financial officials called Sunday for more dialogue on trade disputes that threaten global economic growth, with one warning that differences remain and tensions could escalate further.

One dead, dozens of hostages freed after L.A. standoff

Unidentified Trader Joe's supermarket employees hug after being evacuated by Los Angeles Police after a gunman barricaded himself inside the store in Los Angeles Saturday, July 21, 2018. Police believe a man involved in a standoff at the Los Angeles supermarket shot his grandmother and girlfriend and then fired at officers during a pursuit before he crashed into a utility pole outside the supermarket and ran inside the store. Hours after he took hostages in the store, the suspect surrendered. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A woman was shot and killed when a gunman ran into a busy Los Angeles supermarket where he held dozens of people hostage for about three hours Saturday before handcuffing himself and surrendering to police. No hostages were seriously hurt.

Kavanaugh: Watergate tapes decision may have been wrong

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh glances at reporters during a meeting with Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh suggested several years ago that the unanimous high court ruling in 1974 that forced President Richard Nixon to turn over the Watergate tapes, leading to the end of his presidency, may have been wrongly decided.

Trump finds it ‘inconceivable’ lawyer would tape a client

FILE - In this April 26, 2018 file photo, Michael Cohen leaves federal court in New York. President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer secretly recorded Trump discussing payments to a former Playboy model who said she had an affair with him, The New York Times reported Friday, July 20. The president's current personal lawyer confirmed the conversation and said it showed Trump did nothing wrong, according to the Times. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. (AP) — Donald Trump said Saturday he finds it “inconceivable” that a lawyer would tape a client, as the president weighed in after the disclosure that in the weeks before the 2016 election, his then-personal attorney secretly recorded their discussion about a potential payment for a former Playboy model’s account of having an affair with Trump.

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