Transgender Miss Universe contender speaks up for trans kids

In this photo taken on Tuesday, July 10, 2018, Angela Ponce, who won Spain's Miss Universe competition in June, speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Madrid, Spain. The first transgender woman to compete in the global Miss Universe pageant says that, whether winning or not the beauty title, she wants to make history as a role model for trans children around the globe. (AP Photo/Paul White)

MADRID (AP) — The first transgender woman to compete in the global Miss Universe pageant wants to make history as a role model for trans children around the globe — no matter whether she wins or not the top beauty title.

Government falls short of deadline to reunite kids, parents

Three-year-old Jose Jr., from Honduras, is helped by representative of the Southern Poverty Law Center as he is reunited with his father Tuesday, July 10, 2018, in Phoenix. Lugging little backpacks, smiling immigrant children were scooped up into their parents' arms Tuesday as the Trump administration scrambled to meet a court-ordered deadline to reunite dozens of youngsters forcibly separated from their families at the border. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Some immigrant toddlers are back in the arms of their parents, but others remained in holding facilities away from relatives as federal officials fell short of meeting a court-ordered deadline to reunite dozens of youngsters forcibly separated from their families at the border.

Kavanaugh’s views of presidential power drawing questions

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh arrives for a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s past writings that a president should not be distracted by lawsuits and investigations could become a flashpoint in what’s already shaping up to be a contentious confirmation battle.

Border Protection: NYC mayor crossed border illegally

FILE - In this Thursday, June 21, 2018, file photo, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks alongside a group of other U.S. mayors during a news conference outside a holding facility for immigrant children in Tornillo, Texas, near the Mexico border. U.S. Customs and Border Protection is alleging that de Blasio illegally crossed from Mexico into the U.S. while visiting the El Paso, Texas, area in June, an accusation the mayor’s office flatly denies. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — New York Mayor Bill de Blasio City and his security detail violated both Mexican and U.S. immigration laws by crossing the border on foot during a visit near El Paso, Texas, U.S. Customs and Border Protection alleges in a letter obtained by The Associated Press.

Bill would release records from civil-rights cold cases

FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2018, file photo, Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., leaves a meeting with fellow Democrats just before a procedural vote aimed at reopening the government, at the Capitol in Washington. The federal government would be required to release records from unsolved criminal cases linked to the civil-rights era under a bill proposed Tuesday, July 10, by Jones. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — The federal government would be required to release records from unsolved criminal cases linked to the civil-rights era under a bill proposed Tuesday.

Algae, seaweed discolor Florida waters and beaches

Florida Gov. Rick Scott, left, tours the Caloosahatchee River in Fort Myers, Fla., Monday, July 9, 2018. The governor was touring the river to view a large algae blooms affecting the river. The algae blooms are also affecting the St Lucie River on Florida's east coast. Several factors contribute to the algae blooms including agriculture runoffs, excessive rains and development along the rivers. (Ricardo Rolon/The News-Press via AP)

STUART, Fla. (AP) — Tourism, fishing and public health are being threatened by contaminants discoloring stretches of beaches at the southern end of the Florida peninsula.

Trump claims Germany ‘controlled’ by Russia

U.S. President Donald Trump, second right, listens to NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, left, during their bilateral breakfast, Wednesday July 11, 2018 in Brussels, Belgium. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

BRUSSELS (AP) — President Donald Trump claimed a pipeline project has made Germany “totally controlled” by and “captive to Russia” during a combative breakfast Wednesday that kicked off what was already expected to be a fraught NATO summit.

‘Everyone is safe’ after daring rescue of 13 in Thai cave

In this undated photo released by Royal Thai Navy on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 show the last four Thai Navy SEALs come out safely after completing the rescued mission inside a cave where 12 boys and their soccer coach have been trapped since June 23, in Mae Sai, Chiang Rai province, northern Thailand. Thailand's navy SEALs say all 12 boys and their soccer coach have been rescued from a flooded cave in far northern Thailand, ending an ordeal that lasted more than two weeks. (Royal Thai Navy via AP)

MAE SAI, Thailand (AP) — “Everyone is safe.” With those three words posted on Facebook the daring rescue mission to extricate 12 boys and their soccer coach from the treacherous confines of a flooded cave in Thailand was complete — a grueling 18-day ordeal that claimed the life of an experienced diver and riveted people worldwide.

China vows retaliation for latest U.S. tariff threat

In this July 6, 2018, photo, a container ship is docked at a port in Qingdao in eastern China's Shandong Province. China's government on Wednesday, July 11, 2018, has criticized the latest U.S. threat of a tariff hike as "totally unacceptable" and vowed to retaliate in their escalating trade war. (Chinatopix via AP)

BEIJING (AP) — China slammed the U.S. threat to expand tariff hikes to imports including apples, fish sticks and French doors as a “totally unacceptable” escalation of their trade battle and vowed Wednesday to protect its “core interests.”

Nobel widow allowed to leave China after long house arrest

Liu Xia, the widow of Chinese Nobel dissident Liu Xiaobo, gestures she arrives at the Helsinki International Airport in Vantaa, Finland, Tuesday, July 10, 2018. China on Tuesday allowed Liu Xia to fly to Berlin, ending an eight-year house arrest that had drawn intense international criticism and turned the 57-year old poet _ who reluctantly followed her husband into politics two decades ago _ into a tragic icon known around the world. (Jussi Nukari/ Lehtikuva via AP)

BERLIN (AP) — In the fall of 2010, Liu Xia traveled to a prison in northeast China to tell her husband, dissident intellectual Liu Xiaobo, that he had just been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. That was the last time she left home as a free woman. Until now.

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