Bodies emerge from Guatemala’s war-era ‘model villages’

In this Nov. 30, 2017, an Ixil Mayan carries the remains of a civil war victim to a memorial for a mass burial in Santa Avelina, Guatemala. During the civil war, the army identified the Ixil indigenous region as the support base of a guerrilla group and made it a testing ground for the kind of "strategic hamlet" program used by the U.S. in Vietnam, forcing people to live in army-built and controlled villages coined "centers of development" where many were left to die from malnutrition and treatable illnesses. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)

SANTA AVELINA, Guatemala (AP) — It wasn’t only bullets and violence that killed thousands of indigenous people during Guatemala’s 1960-1996 civil war.

As West Coast fights homelessness, kindness is contentious

Young volunteers from Lion's Heart, a non-profit community service organization, prepare sack lunches for homeless people Thursday, Dec. 21, 2017, in Dana Point, Calif. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Mohammed Aly does not see any reason why he shouldn’t try to ease the lives of Orange County’s homeless. But the authorities — and many of his neighbors — disagree.

Ruling but no resolution on which teen killers merit parole

ADVANCE FOR RELEASE SUNDAY, DEC. 31, 2017 AND THEREAFTER -FILE - In this Saturday, April 26, 2014 file photo, the sun shines through concertina wire on a fence at the Louisiana State Penitentiary in Angola, La. Nearly two years after the January 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that prison inmates who killed as teenagers are capable of change and may deserve eventual freedom, the question remains unresolved: Which ones should get a second chance? (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Nearly two years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that prison inmates who killed as teenagers are capable of change and may deserve eventual freedom, the question remains unresolved: Which ones should get a second chance?

Russian hackers hunted journalists in years-long campaign

In this Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014 photo, Dozhd Channel anchor Pavel Lobkov, prepares for a broadcast in their studio-apartment in Moscow, Russia. In December 2015, Lobkov was getting ready for his show when jarring news flashed across his phone: Some of his most intimate messages had just been published to the web. “I think the hackers in the service of the Fatherland were long getting their training on our lot before venturing outside.” (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

PARIS (AP) — Russian television anchor Pavel Lobkov was in the studio getting ready for his show when jarring news flashed across his phone: Some of his most intimate messages had just been published to the web.

Urban killings rise in clusters as many areas grow safer

Members of the Ten Point Coalition pray with a family during a walk, Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, in Indianapolis. Four nights a week, they walk their streets, talking to young people and trying to point them away from trouble. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — When she started an urban farm in one of Indianapolis’ roughest neighborhoods, retired chemist Aster Bekele wanted to teach at-risk kids how to garden, and maybe sneak in a little science.

AP finds climate change risk for 327 toxic Superfund sites

In this Dec. 11, 2017 photo, men in protective clothing work at the Martin Aaron Inc. Superfund site in Camden, N.J, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017. Hundreds of the nation’s most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. An Associated Press analysis of flood zone, census and EPA data shows that almost 2 million people live within a mile of more than 300 at-risk toxic sites, mostly in low-income, heavily minority neighborhoods. These sites span the nation, but Florida, New Jersey and California have the most. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

TARPON SPRINGS, Fla. (AP) — Anthony Stansbury propped his rusty bike against a live oak tree and cast his fishing line into the rushing waters of Florida’s Anclote River.

Mosul’s morgue men sought glimmer of humanity amid atrocity

In this Nov. 8, 2017 photo, chief medical assistant Raid Jassim adjusts his gloves before inspecting a body in a morgue in Mosul, Iraq. The morgue staff saw the worst of what the Islamic State group was capable of inflicting on a human being. Though terrorized, they managed moments of humanity and sometimes defiance (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

MOSUL, Iraq (AP) — The morgue in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul was where atrocity met bureaucracy.

Rohingya survivors: Myanmar’s army slaughtered men, children

In this Friday Nov. 24, 2017, photo, Mohammadul Hassan, 18, is photographed in his family's tent in Jamtoli refugee camp in Bangladesh. Hassan still bears the scars on his chest and back from being shot by soldiers who attempted to kill him. More than 650,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar since August, and many have brought with them stories of atrocities committed by security forces in Myanmar, including an Aug. 27 army massacre that reportedly took place in the village of Maung Nu. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

UKHIA, Bangladesh (AP) — For six hours he hid in an upstairs room, listening to the crackle of gunfire and the screams of people being slaughtered outside his Myanmar home.

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